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PO Box 178
Monkton, MD 21111
(410) 472-1172
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Last Updated:
9/28/2020 4:55 PM
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Here are the answers to some of our most frequently asked questions.

 

Where is your shelter located?

Pet Rescue of Maryland is a network of volunteer foster homes. We do not have a shelter. If you would like to meet a certain animal, please email us with the animals' name in the subject heading and we will try to make arrangements for you to meet the animal. 

 

I don't live in Maryland, but I am willing to drive to meet the dog/cat. Can I still adopt from you?

One tool we use to find the best homes for our pets is to visit your home. We need to verify the condition of your fence, meet your other pets and just check out the living conditions. Unfortunately, we can not drive further than 30-40 miles from Baltimore, MD to do a home visit. We can not accept home visit approvals by other rescue organizations as proof that your house meets our requirements. We also can not return long distance phone calls. It might seem like your call would only cost a few dollars, but after a few calls, that adds up to the price of a neuter or a series of vaccinations. If you are looking for a specific breed of dog, there are most likely several dogs that would be perfect for you who need a home in your area. Please use a search engine like yahoo or google and search, "specific dog breed - rescue- your state". Petfinder.com is also a wonderful resource- just be sure to use your zipcode in their search engine so the animals you find are in your area. You will find several organizations who might have the animal you are looking for in your neighborhood.

 

What happens if my dog/cat does not like the new pet we adopt?

We take every precaution to make sure that the animal we place with you is the best fit for your entire family. In the case of dogs, we insist on a meeting with your existing dogs and the potential new dog on neutral territory, where everyone can sniff each other and decide if they should be friends. If for some reason, the new dog/cat do not get along with each other after a reasonable adjustment and training period, we will take the animal back. In this type of situation, we do require you to return the animal to us. You may not give it to a family member or friend. Should you know of someone who would like to adopt the animal, they must go through the standard adoption process.


How long does it take?

Pet Rescue of Maryland is run by volunteers. We all work equally hard at our paying jobs as we do our volunteer jobs. The total time from meeting the animal to taking them home is about 2 weeks. We are able to process cats slightly faster. We never do same day adoptions.


Why do you insist on a home visit?

We insist on a home visit for many reasons. We need to confirm the details of your application. Sometimes our opinion of a large backyard and your opinion may differ. Sometimes a fence might have a hole that you did not realize was there. We are not inspecting your home for cleanliness or judging you on any personal level. We just want to make sure that your home is the safest and the best home for the new pet.


What if my new pet is too young to have received all of the included vetting?

If your new puppy or kitten is too young to have received all of the vetting (vaccinations, spay or neutering) that is included in the adoption price, we will put you on a vet schedule to make sure that all of the needed medical treatment will be completed. We ask that you take your new pet to the vet appointments and we will take care of the expenses. You must use our vet.


Does my puppy/kitten have to be spayed or neutered?

It is mandatory that all animals in our program be spayed or neutered. Each year, between 4 and 5 million animals are euthanized because they are unwanted. Just one female dog or cat, in its lifetime, has the capability of producing tens of thousand of other animals as each generation also reproduces*. Spaying and neutering is one of the best ways to help control the animal over-population problem facing the US today. There are no exceptions to this rule.



* according to SNAP, 2005.





We save animals from a variety of crisis situations.

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